Taiko Right-Left Practice (Drill)

Composer: Andreas Prescher / Kumano Taiko Dojo
Arrangement: Andreas Prescher / Kumano Taiko Dojo
Composition Date: 2016
License: (c) 2016 Andreas Prescher / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

About

A short, fun drill to train right and left sticking. This arrangement is for two chus and a chappa.

(Original composition name: Taiko Rechts-Links Ubung)

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

mp3:

 

Score PDF: Taiko_Rechts-Links_Ubung

Check Pattern (Drill)

Composer: Thom Hannum
Arrangement: David Cheetham
Composition Date: 2012
License: Open Source

About

Notes from arranger, David Cheetham…

This drill is an algorithmic approach to playing all possible combinations of notes within a single beat using a 4-part subdivision (16th notes, or 4 notes per beat). There are 16 possibilities, and this exercise covers them all in a logical order.

The exercise is played with the first line being repeated after each individual line, and the sticking for an individual line is always dictated by the first line, i.e. if a note’s position within the beat means it is left-handed in the first line, it will be left-handed in the individual line regardless of what else is happening in that line.

This drill is best played with a metronome and at a wide variety of tempos. There are also many variations and mutations of this drill for working on specific skills, such as splitting the ensemble into 2 groups and playing different patterns which interlock against each other, or playing it “filled in” where one plays all 4 notes every beat but adds an accent to the notes present in each pattern. This drill can also be played in a swing style for additional variation.

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

mp3:

PDF: check-pattern-2012-hannum-xlsx

Editable Excel file: check-pattern-2012-hannum

 

2164

Composer: Compose By Numbers Workshop Participants, Minnesota 2011
Arrangement: Wendy Jedlička
Composition date: 2011
License: Creative Commons Share Alike.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/

About

From workshop host Wendy Jedlička…

“On a 10°F evening in mid-January, a bunch of curious people got together in the (chilly) Taiko practice room at 2164 Rosewood Ln N, in Roseville MN, USA, with Kris Bergstrom, Maz Baba, and Shoji Kameda to delight in their Compose by Number Workshop — we soon warmed-up the place!”

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

Notation PDF: 2164-ComposeByNumber011711
mp3:

See Also

Compose By Number: A step-by-step guide to composition for taiko by Kristofer Bergstrom
ComposeByNumberTaiko-cbn_root

Find more PDF scores, midi and mp3 files in the Taiko Jinsei Audio Pool
http://www.jedlicka.com/taikojinsei/TaikoJinsei-AudioPool

Kinzoku

Composer: Grady Mayo
Choreography: Jen Kong & Korabo Taiko
Composition date: 2015
License: (c)2015 Grady Mayo. Released under Creative Commons Share Alike license.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/
For additional help/information concerning Kinzoku, or if you would like to share your alterations with the composer, please contact Grady Mayo through Facebook, or email on score PDF.

About

From composer Grady Mayo…

Kinzoku means “metal”, and was heavily inspired by the genre of music that shares its namesake. I wrote this piece, originally, out of curiosity. I had ideas in my head that I wanted to put onto paper, and I ended up writing the first draft of the piece on a music notation program. After translating what was on the paper to actual drums, editing the song, and incorporating some choreography into the music, Korabo Taiko conceived the piece.

Kinzoku, itself, is structured much like Western popular music (verse-bridge-chorus format) and includes several metal-inspired rhythms and feels. The three “verses” serve as avenues that showcase the three different player groups – odaiko, chu-daiko, and taiko set. The piece is quite complex; the rhythms create strange grooves for the players, the time signature is woven out of odd meters, and the ji steadily changes. I hope that this piece provides a rewarding challenge for groups that take it on.

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece. (Kinzoku-GradyMayo-2015.pdf)

PDF Score: Kinzoku-GradyMayo-2015

Videos

Taiko Set Part: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6R4LEYGW8ao

Chu Part: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZIzMUiG7KU

Odaiko Part: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEYQuy6KlTA

ALL Parts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xa9hZ6PVTY&feature=youtu.be

See Also

Kinzoku is released under the “Creative Commons Share Alike” License. The composer encourages everyone to learn, practice, and perform the piece. If you would like to modify it, please give proper credit to the original composer and share the modified piece under the same license. For additional help/information concerning Kinzoku, or if you would like to share your alterations with the composer, please contact Grady Mayo directly.

Korabo Taiko
https://www.facebook.com/korabotaiko

Rebel Taiko Experiment
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx0fIGdt7eMZnYs0ehyU7RA

Grady Mayo on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/grady.mayo.9

Michinoku

Composer: Mitsuaki Sato
Arrangement: Sousaku Wadaiko Komanokai
Composition Date: June 30, 2011
License: (c)2011 Mitsuaki Sato. All rights reserved. Commercial use and reproduction of the score without permission is prohibited. This piece may be performed after purchase of the score. Purchase score: http://www.taiko-center.co.jp/english/index.html

A portion of the score sales are donated to the Aoi Koinobori Project as a reconstruction support fund for Tohoku. Aoi Koinobori Project: http://www.ryukoutengoku.info/3.11/ritsu.html

About

From Togo Miyahara, Taiko Center Co.,Ltd
(http://taiko-center.co.jp)…

After the great east Japan earthquake, this piece was first performed by “Sousaku Wadaiko Komanokai” — one of the pioneers of today’s taiko music — with taiko groups from the devastated coast area as part of their regular concert in 2011. Additionally, every May 5th the song has been performed to pray for the children who lost their lives and for the recovery of their hometown as part of an event called Aoi Koinobori Project held in Ohmagarihama, Higashi Matsushima city. This piece has also been performed by taiko groups in Las Vegas, and each year continues to spread around world.

Many players have performed this piece as a prayer for Tohoku, the region hardest hit by the 2011 earthquake. The score “Michinoku” was launched for sale on March 11th, 5 years after the earthquake. We believe that art and traditional performance is part of its heart and soul. Let’s play the sounds that bind us together, and dream that this piece will be performed as a prayer for those who lost their homes and loved ones, and hopes for a brighter future.

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

Purchase score: http://www.taiko-center.co.jp/english/index.htm
Click: Shop / Other Products

Videos

東日本大震災復興祈願和太鼓合同曲「陸奥-MICHINOKU-」
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dkq9IgMtQiM

See Also

http://taiko-center.co.jp

Beginnings

Composer: Marco Lienhard
Choreography & Arrangement: Marco Lienhard
License: (c)1995 Marco Lienhard. Use with permission. After workshop, credit song with proper info on song and composer.

About

From composer Marco Lienhard…

Beginnings was written as a celebratory song. After the hard labor of creating the islands, the land and the people — the Gods of Japan rejoice with this song.

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

Music will be made available if workshop is conducted through Marco Lienhard.

For more information visit: http://marcolienhard.com

Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_TNEBb1dDs

See Also

http://taikoza.com

http://marcolienhard.com

Kagura

Composer: Traditional, arranged by Tsukiboshi Sensei
Choreography & Arrangement: Tsukiboshi, M. Lienhard (Arrangement 1995)
License: Use with proper credit: Tsukiboshi, M. Lienhard arrangement.

About

From Marco Lienhard…

This is one of the basic songs of the Kaitoryu style.

Kagura means shrine (shinto) music. This is performed during the Spring celebration at the Shinto shrine of Tobishima Mura in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. Passed on to members of Ondekoza by Tsukiboshi Sensei, it is accompanied by a Matsuribue tuned by Tsukiboshi Sensei that usually is played along with the taiko piece.

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

Music will be made available if workshop is conducted through Marco Lienhard.

For more information visit: http://marcolienhard.com

Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T8otu0PLv4

 

See Also

http://taikosource.com/?s=kagura

http://taikoza.com

http://marcolienhard.com

 

Makura-Gaeshi

Composer: Gregory P. Richards
Composition date: 2014
License: (c)2014 Gregory P. Richards. Use with proper credit.

About

From composer Gregory P. Richards…

The Makura-Gaeshi (枕返し) is a mischievous yokai, or Japanese demon, that appears in various tales of Japanese folklore. Its name means “pillow flipper,” and true to its moniker, it is known to hide in bedrooms, waiting until the occupants are asleep in bed, then steal the sleepers’ pillows from under their heads and replace them at their feet.

Matthew Meyer of yokai.com says of the makura-gaeshi, “Makura-gaeshi are a kind of zashiki-warashi: a child ghost which haunts specific rooms of a house. They are found all over Japan, though details about them vary from region to region. They take the form of a small child dressed as a Niō, a monk, or a samurai, and appear in bedrooms late at night…While most stories about makura-gaeshi present them as harmless pranksters, there are a few stories that describe scarier powers. Some don’t flip the pillow, but lift up and flip people instead. Others pick up entire tatami mats that people are sleeping on and bounce them around.  Still others are said to sit on their victim’s chest while he or she sleeps, pressing down hard and squeezing the wind out of the lung. They occasionally cause kanashibari, or sleep paralysis. The most extreme stories say that anyone who sees a makura-gaeshi loses consciousness, after which the makura-gaeshi steals their soul, leaving them dead.”

Horror manga artist Shigeru Mizuki, known for his yokai-themed manga GeGeGe no Kitaro, adds an extra element on to the makura-gaeshi by giving them two brains: one for thinking up pranks, and the other solely dedicated to creating rainbows that the yokai can shoot out of its eyes.

Greg Richards’ take on the makura-gaeshi legend combines these myriad elements into a composition showcasing the many talents of this versatile yokai.

 

Files

Scores, notes, and audio files to help learn this piece.

See attached zip file with full score…

Zip File: makuragaeshi

Videos

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUCUd14qNUcoV4MKPGX0eXTPZ7bXebQx4

See Also

http://www.shindaiko.com/site/2015/09/10/makura-gaeshi/

 

 

Submit a Song

Contributing a song to the TaikoSource.com Song Database is a great way to get the word out about your talents if you’re a composer, a super easy way to get your name to new students if you’re a teacher, and a fabulous way to share with the whole taiko community if you’re a group. Simply email the info below to — contact [at] taiko [dot] biz — and we’ll work with you to get your song posted.

HUGE thanks for participating!

 


Song Details:

Title: Song name (Alternate name)

Composer: Composer Name(s)

Arrangement: Arranger Name(s) if different than composer

Choreography: Who created the dance moves (for songs including dance)

Composition date: Year song was created

Copyright holder: (c) Composer (and/or others)

License: How would you like to get credit and have your song shared? (Take a look at other song entries. Plus read below…)

About

— Tell us the backstory of your song.

Videos

— YouTube, or Vimeo URL (no private URLS please!)

Files

— PDFs of song scores, and/or practice notes (if you have them)

See Also

— Other handy things to know about the song, or how to find you or your group. URLs are preferred: Group page, Facebook, etc.

 


Choosing a License:

 

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If you have a song that is being shared without your permission, the TaikoSource.com Song Database would be a good place to set the record straight (See Yodan entry). Please note: Copyright laws differ from country to country, and it is up to the song’s copyright holder to properly obtain (register), track, and enforce their copyright.

Copyright U.S.: http://www.copyright.gov/
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Copyright Japan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_law_of_Japan

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http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/

Open Source: In non-software terms this has come to mean, works made freely available to perform, record, or teach the work with no expectation of originator credit or compensation. As a mater of respect, all songs submitted to this Song Database as “Open Source” will be posted instead as “Use with Proper Credit” unless otherwise instructed by the composer.

Original software development definition: http://opensource.org/osd

Kuchishoga Periodic Table

Author: Kristofer Bergstrom, taiko.la
Date: 2015
(First appearance 2012, http://onensemble.org/2012/12/work-in-progres-squarepusher/)
License: Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike International 4.0

About

The Kuchishoga Periodic Table is a graphic notation system for taiko — including kuchishoga — for documentation and communication of a wide variety of sounds on the Taiko drum as well as movements.

Notation PDF:  kuchishoga_periodic_table_150621
Draft ver. 150621. Posted with permission.

For ongoing updates visit:
Kris’ Blog (Coming soon…)

Videos

Example of pieces using this notation system

Early sketches:
https://vimeo.com/56562078

Refined piece:
https://vimeo.com/109715737

From Kris…
Squarepusher score: squarepusher_score_121230
Here is a very rough draft of the score for the piece [Squarepusher using the Kuchishoga Periodic Table Notation]. It’s incomplete in parts and hasn’t been split properly into pages, but for the brave taiko explorer, it has the tone and sticking notation.

See Also

Los Angeles Taiko Institute (LATI)
http://taiko.la